Tech fatigue in travel.

time
weddingdress
hospital
shopping
auto
game
desk
rock
office
paypal
book
diplomcay
care
sport
clothes
cosmetic
dentist
marketing
architecture
searchengines
book
time
party
weddingdress
hospital
shopping
auto
desk
rock
office
paypal
diplomcay
care
sport
clothes
book
time
party
weddingdress
hospital
baby
bag
chinese
fat
film
gaming
hbo
hot
ice
mouse
time
weddingdress
hospital
shopping
auto
game
desk
rock
office
paypal
book
diplomcay
care
sport
clothes
cosmetic
dentist
marketing
architecture
searchengines
book
time
party
weddingdress
hospital
shopping
auto
desk
rock
office
paypal
diplomcay
care
sport
clothes
book
time
party
weddingdress
hospital
baby
bag
chinese
fat
film
gaming
hbo
hot
ice
mouse
baby
bag
chinese
fat
film
gaming
hbo
hot
ice
mouse
music
novel
red
rock
science
sexy
show
sports
study
train
weight
wow
auto
book
care
clothes
desk
diplomcay
hospital
office
party
paypal
rock
shopping
sport
time
weddingdress
baby
bag
chinese
fat
film
gaming
hbo
hot
ice
mouse
music
novel
red

Most boutique hotels survive on about 40% occupancy. While we know this to be true in places like Africa and Latin America, I’ve been surprised to learn when citing this statistic in Telluride, Colorado (where we’re participating in a fantastic accelerator program) the immediate response from any local is, “yep and that is the same here in Telluride.”

I can’t think of many other industries where 40% would be considered great. Except maybe predicting the weather and venture capital (ha!).

The fact is this is a LOT of empty hotel beds sitting empty every night across the globe. We are sitting on the edge of massive innovation in travel distribution. While large hotel chains become more sophisticated and dialed into big data trends, it’s almost as if the boutique hotel sector of the industry are moving in completely the opposite direction.

We’re betting that the next big advance in travel technology – the advance that is going to drive the next billion dollars – isn’t highly sophisticated technology. It’s stupidly simple and focused on selling the 60% of boutique hotel rooms sitting empty each night. This is just way too much money being left on the table to avoid focus for much longer.

What do you think is the future of travel technology for boutique hotels? Leave a comment or let us know what you think on Twitter (@askglobali.)

And boutique hotels… apply for a Beta invite for Globa.li today. Globa.li helps you manage reservations, connect with trade partners, increase occupancy and be more efficient. Net result? We’ll help you fill those empty beds.